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CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

See the latest Coronavirus statistics from across the world on our world map SEE MAP UK Confirmed cases: 51,608 | UK Deaths: 5,373 | UK Recovered: 135 SEE MAP Italy Confirmed cases: 132,547 | Italy Deaths: 16,523 | Italy Recovered: 22,837 SEE MAP Spain Confirmed cases: 136,675 | Spain Deaths: 13,341 | Spain Recovered: 40,437 SEE MAP See the latest Coronavirus statistics from across the world on our world map SEE MAP UK Confirmed cases: 51,608 | UK Deaths: 5,373 | UK Recovered: 135 SEE MAP Italy Confirmed cases: 132,547 | Italy Deaths: 16,523 | Italy Recovered: 22,837 SEE MAP Spain Confirmed cases: 136,675 | Spain Deaths: 13,341 | Spain Recovered: 40,437 SEE MAP

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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Maintenance work CAN be carried out in homes says government

The government has yet to give explicit guidance relating to private rental maintenance, but new advice this morning appears to shed some light on the issue. 

While Propertymark says the government is still looking into property maintenance tasks such as gas safety checks, a statement at 7am today from the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government offers more clarity.

It says:

Work carried out in people’s homes, for example by tradespeople carrying out repairs and maintenance, can continue, provided that the tradesperson is well and has no symptoms. 

Again, it will be important to ensure that Public Health England guidelines, including maintaining a two metre distance from any household occupants, are followed to ensure everyone’s safety.

No work should be carried out in any household which is isolating or where an individual is being shielded, unless it is to remedy a direct risk to the safety of the household, such as emergency plumbing or repairs, and where the tradesperson is willing to do so. In such cases, Public Health England can provide advice to tradespeople and households.

No work should be carried out by a tradesperson who has coronavirus symptoms, however mild.

However, agents and landlords may still be wary of sending in maintenance staff.

In practical terms, many builders' merchants are closed.

And wider issues such as liability should a tradesperson either apparently picks up or apparently transmits Coronavirus while working in an occupied property remain uncertain.

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    Great news from the government’s latest statement clarifying the maintenance issue. Emergency maintenance can be carried out if all the precautions are taken. Our advice to all our tenants is to open the door and then stay in one room away from where our engineer is working. Our gas engineers, electricians, plumbers, roofers and locksmiths are all wearing PPE and following Public Health Guidelines. At GPM UK we are constantly striving to support our Landlords and Agents and never more so than now in these challenging times.

    Stephen Chipp

    I dont read this as only 'emergency' maintenance can be done but all maintenance as long as proper process is followed...?! In fact it seems to suggest even if someone is symptomatic contractors could attend in an emergency?!

    Does anyone read it differently?

     
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    I read it as we don’t have enough police to forcible lock us down and they are trying their hardest to not cause either a panic or realisation that mass civil disobedience would be difficult to contain. Everything Govt. is saying is to appeal to the public’s better nature.

     
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    How can anyone Read Only EMERGENCY Maintenance, as ANY maintenance, - do people not get what the Govt are trying to do for the greater good ( whether you agree with it or not )

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    It is too difficult to determine what is essential works. I have a property where the tenant has a leak from the flat above (also mine) which means that either she can't use her second bedroom or he can't have a shower. However, the agent who manages these for me says that the work doesn't constitute essential work. The tenant is, rightly, annoyed because she can't use her second bedroom and is threatening to pay the rent for a one bedroom flat ad this was an issue she had before lockdown that we thought was fixed. Is she right or the agent?

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    If your agent doesn’t believe that a leak from one flat to another is essential work, then find another agent! The leak is damaging your property.

     
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    Water leaks causing damage - are Essential - Emergencies, in my view and I don't think anyone would disagree.

     
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