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Written by rosalind renshaw

More than one in ten landlords (14.5%) say that some or all properties in their portfolio fall into the bottom Energy Performance Certificate categories, with an F or G rating.

The finding, which emerged in a survey of 1,500 landlords by the Association of Residential Letting Agents, could mean a sharp reduction in the supply of rental properties.

From 2018, properties with low EPC ratings – likely to be anything below E – will be banned from the rental market.

The same ARLA survey also showed that more than one third of landlords (36%) do not know the energy rating of their properties.
 
Alan Ward, chairman of the Residential Landlords Association, called for the Landlord’s Energy Saving Allowance – an annual tax allowance – to be raised from £1,500 to £14,000. The allowance is due to be scrapped altogether in April 2015.

Comments

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    "in a survey of 1,500 landlords by the Association of Residential Letting Agents, could mean a sharp reduction in the supply of rental properties."

    So, more homelessness for the sake of F & G - or what?
    There should be some 'balance' involved here - perfection in application is very rare.

    • 12 June 2012 09:42 AM
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    IHS

    No-one knows.

    No-one even knows if a property can remain occupied even with the existing tenant post April 2018 if it is a band F or G rated property.

    Or even if F and G are to be the 'banned' ratings.

    It is all complete speculation - though if a band F or G new property to the market cannot be let after April 2018 it seems rather odd to allow Landlords to re-let existing F and G ones even if they have made every effort. You may find that the discretion if there is any will only apply where the improvements were completed before Apriul 2018.

    As I say - no-one knows not even CLG themselves.

    This is the latest

    http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/pn12_073/pn12_073.aspx

    and may help

    • 12 June 2012 09:05 AM
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    We have properties that would remain on or below Band E even after the EA's recommended improvements. However we understand that as long the improvements are carried out then even if the property remains on Band E or below it can still be let. This mainly affects listed period properties where planning law prevents certain changes such as the installation of double glazing etc.

    • 12 June 2012 08:48 AM
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