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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Online agency says over half of tenants denied energy improvements

An online lettings agency claims that 58 per cent of tenants who have requested energy improvements to their properties have been refused their wish - despite changes to the law since April this year.

From this spring tenants living in private rental sector properties with F and G eco-ratings have been able to request improvements, such as more insulation and landlords are legally bound to bring the property up to the minimum of an Energy Performance Certificate E rating. 

Under the new legislation, if a tenant requests a more efficient home and the landlord fails to comply, the landlord could ultimately be forced to pay a penalty notice.

Now PropertyLetByUs claims that around seven out of 10 tenants have made requests to their landlord to make improvements to the property - but so far over half have been rejected,

“Landlords that are trying to rent cold, draughty and damp accommodation should immediately start improving their properties. It’s estimated that around one million tenants are paying as much as £1,000 a year more for heating than the average annual bill of £1,265. These excessive costs are mainly down to poorly insulated homes” says the agency’s managing director, Jane Morris.

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