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There's still too little specialist student accommodation, says website

Despite what many in the industry believe to be an upsurge in specialist student accommodation construction in recent years, one student property listings platform claims there is still too little to meet demand.

“In the past few years, investors have spent billions of pounds on student accommodation due to current shortages and high demand, but despite this, many campuses continue to have an inadequate number of properties” says a statement from StudentTenant.com.

It says that despite tuition fee rises and uncertainty for overseas students caused by the UK’s Brexit vote, universities have continued to see overwhelming levels of interest from potential students.

“But with a lack of suitable housing in the student rental sector to meet this demand, not only is the further education of these students being impeded, but so is their first experience of the housing cycle” claims the firm.

“For many of us, going to college or university will be our first taste of the property life-cycle in the rental sector. Unfortunately, there is a high chance that this will leave a sour taste in the mouth as many students struggle to find suitable accommodation” says a spokesman for the platform.

He says it is a shame that the rental sector is not a top priority on the Government’s agenda this year. 

“If they can’t manage to provide an appropriate level of affordable housing, they should at least ensure that there is an adequate rental sector to fall back on. Regulation of pricing in the sector would be a good start, particularly for students who are forced to pay extortionate prices in areas of high demand” he says.

  • John Boyle

    StudentTenant.com correctly identifies the problem and then provides a solution to make the problem worse. Pushing prices down below market rates reduces supply and will make it even more difficult for students to find beds.

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